Facts About Re-entry

Effective Prisoner Re-entry In New Jersey

The facts:

1. NJ has invested in a significant re-entry infrastructure. Over the last two decades, there has been substantial growth in community programs mostly in response to prison overcrowding. On any given day, NJ now has over 3,500 beds in more than 30 residential programs serving both inmates and parolees. There are 11 day reporting centers (now community resource centers) serving 750 parolees, statewide. Managing the transition home is best done by community corrections providers.

2. Community Corrections Providers deliver positive results and promote public safety. Since 1999, the prison population in New Jersey has shrunk approximately 24% due to the successful community corrections strategies. Simultaneously two community based programs in NJ demonstrated a more than 30% reduction in recidivism. Offenders who participate in halfway houses and day reporting centers are better prepared for the community and are less likely to re-offend than offenders who leave prison without transitional services.

3. Community Programs save tax payers dollars. NJ has defied the national trend and reduced the number of people in State prisons by expanding community programs. While the prison population has decreased, community corrections alternatives increased, the crime rate has NOT increased in the state of New Jersey. The State can save up to $4 for every $1 invested in Community Programs. These savings multiply dramatically in the out-years.

4. There is a substantial body of research supporting evidence-based practices in re-entry. New Jersey’s Department of Corrections and State Parole Board have compelled community corrections providers to use evidence-based approaches in their work to promote the best possible outcomes and responsible rehabilitative efforts.The investment in this infrastructure and alternatives to incarceration preceded any statewide re-entry strategy. It was built under the tenure of different governors, different legislators and a procession of commissioners and chairman responsible for prisoners and prisoner re-entry. The public/private partnership that has been forged in the last 15 years that affords re-entry services more than 13,000 offenders is unique, robust and replicable for other justice-involved populations. In some states, the effort to expand alterative evidence-based implementation portfolios is attempting to target moderate levels or 20% of eligible offenders. Annually, New Jersey’s community providers outpace this level and serve nearly 32% of inmates leaving state prison and nearly half those on parole. This number is not inclusive of the parole clients served at more than 65 locations in the State through the Mutual Assistance Program funded through a partnership with the Division of Mental Health and Addictions Services in outpatient and residential settings.

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4. There is a substantial body of research supporting evidence-based practices in re-entry. New Jersey’s Department of Corrections and State Parole Board have compelled community corrections providers to use evidence-based approaches in their work to promote the best possible outcomes and responsible rehabilitative efforts.

The investment in this infrastructure and alternatives to incarceration preceded any statewide re-entry strategy. It was built under the tenure of different governors, different legislators and a procession of commissioners and chairman responsible for prisoners and prisoner re-entry. The public/private partnership that has been forged in the last 15 years that affords re-entry services more than 13,000 offenders is unique, robust and replicable for other justice-involved populations. In some states, the effort to expand alternative evidence-based implementation portfolios is attempting to target moderate levels or 20% of eligible offenders. Annually, New Jersey’s community providers outpace this level and serve nearly 32% of inmates leaving state prison and nearly half those on parole. This number is not inclusive of the parole clients served at more than 65 locations in the State through the Mutual Assistance Program funded through a partnership with the Division of Mental Health and Addictions Services in outpatient and residential settings.